5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students | Edutopia

Many would agree that for inquiry to be alive and well in a classroom that, amongst other things, the teacher needs to be expert at asking strategic questions, and not only asking well-designed ones, but ones that will also lead students to questions of their own.

via 5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students | Edutopia.

Bloom’s Taxonomy

Bloom’s Taxonomy.

This webpage gives a nice overview of Bloom’s Taxonomy, a classification system that describes intellectual Behavior. And, this website includes a new version of the taxonomy, which uses verbs (rather than nouns) to describe levels of learning.

As you teach an assignment, move your students through these levels of learning and consider how each class and its activities fit into this larger scheme.

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students | Edutopia

via 5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students | Edutopia.

Many would agree that for inquiry to be alive and well in a classroom that, amongst other things, the teacher needs to be expert at asking strategic questions, and not only asking well-designed ones, but ones that will also lead students to questions of their own.

Check out this article for 5 questions you can ask in the classroom.

It Is Expensive to Be Poor – Barbara Ehrenreich – The Atlantic

An article in the Atlantic Monthly by Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America, about how we definitions of poverty in America. In this article she discusses the tragectory from President Johnson’s “War on Poverty” to the idea that women on welfare are miscreants:

Instead of treating low-wage mothers as the struggling heroines they are, our political culture still tends to view them as miscreants and contributors to the “cycle of poverty.”

via It Is Expensive to Be Poor – Barbara Ehrenreich – The Atlantic.

In 260, have students read the article, identifying and evaluating these definitions of “poor.” What are the claims, reasons, and warrants that support these different definitions? How are these definitions used and why are they important to understand?

CHART OF THE DAY: How Technology Has Changed In The Last 8 Years – Business Insider

CHART OF THE DAY: How Technology Has Changed In The Last 8 Years – Business Insider.

A very interesting chart that shows changes in consumer electronics since 2005. Share this chart with students in ENL266 to talk about iFixit and their mission to repair our stuff. Their random thought from looking at the chart: “While there’s a lot of new stuff, old tech dies hard.”

In class, have student groups study the chart and come up with their own “random thought” to share with the class. Doing so encourages them to see how different people interpret the same information and it helps them to think about their purpose and goals for the iFixit project.

Improve Your PowerPoint Design with One Simple Rule | Faculty Focus

Improve Your PowerPoint Design with One Simple Rule | Faculty Focus.

We’ve all heard the expressions “Death by PowerPoint” and “PowerPoint-induced coma.” I think we’d all agree that most of PowerPoints stink. Yet after sitting through presentation after presentation that bore us to tears, we turn around and subject our students and colleagues to the same torture that we find so excruciating. Why?

The good news is that 90% of the problem can be solved by following one simple rule:No bullet points.

A great article for class discussion. What are the “rules” of PowerPoint? What about this new rule: No Bullet Points? Does this “rule” apply to all situations? Can students create a presentation without bullet points?

BBC – Podcasts and Downloads – More or Less: Behind the Stats

BBC – Podcasts and Downloads – More or Less: Behind the Stats.

Tim Harford investigates numbers in the news. Numbers are used in every area of public debate. But are they always reliable? Tim and the More or Less team try to make sense of the statistics which surround us. A half-hour programme broadcast at 1600 on Friday afternoons and repeated at 2000 on Sundays on Radio 4. BBC World Service broadcasts a short edition over the weekend.

Use these BBC podcasts as an in-class activity or homework to think about the reliability of numbers and the ways in which statistical information is used to make arguments.