Prezi – Blog – TED Talks Are Wildly Addictive for 5 Scientific Reasons

Carmine Gallo is a popular keynote speaker, communication coach, and author of seven books including international bestsellers, The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs and Talk Like TED: The 9 Public-Speaking Secrets of the World’s Top Minds. He works with executives leading the brands that touch your life everyday, helping them to tell their stories more successfully.

He says, “In the last ten years researchers studying brain scans have learned more about the science of persuasion than we’ve ever known in all of civilization. That means we know what moves people, and we can prove it scientifically. After analyzing more than 500 TED presentations adding up to over 150 hours of talks and speaking directly to successful TED presenters and leading neuroscientists, I’ve discovered that the most popular TED presentations share five common elements that are all based on the science of persuasion. Best of all, you can use these five scientific principles to create more awe-inspiring presentations.”

Check out the 5 principles here: Prezi – Blog – TED Talks Are Wildly Addictive for 5 Scientific Reasons.

Improve Your PowerPoint Design with One Simple Rule | Faculty Focus

Improve Your PowerPoint Design with One Simple Rule | Faculty Focus.

We’ve all heard the expressions “Death by PowerPoint” and “PowerPoint-induced coma.” I think we’d all agree that most of PowerPoints stink. Yet after sitting through presentation after presentation that bore us to tears, we turn around and subject our students and colleagues to the same torture that we find so excruciating. Why?

The good news is that 90% of the problem can be solved by following one simple rule:No bullet points.

A great article for class discussion. What are the “rules” of PowerPoint? What about this new rule: No Bullet Points? Does this “rule” apply to all situations? Can students create a presentation without bullet points?

Model Presentations by Students

From Michael Alley at Penn State, check out these videos of student presentations. Here’s Michael Alley’s explanation:

Because of TED.com, many high quality films exist of engineers and scientists presenting. However, corresponding examples of students presenting are lacking. Such model presentations by students are important because many of our students cannot project themselves presenting in the same manner or generating the same level of content as TED speakers do.

At Penn State, we have tried to address this void with the following examples:http://writing.engr.psu.edu/models.html

Model Presentations by Students.

The science of stage fright and how to overcome it – Mikael Cho | TED-Ed

The science of stage fright and how to overcome it – Mikael Cho | TED-Ed.

Heart racing, palms sweating, labored breathing? No, you’re not having a heart attack — it’s stage fright! If speaking in public makes you feel like you’re fighting for your life, you’re not alone. But the better you understand your body’s reaction, the more likely you are to overcome it. Mikael Cho advises how to trick your brain and steal the show.

Hacking Prezi as a Platform for Visual Composition and Design Experimentation – ProfHacker – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Check out this article for ways to use Prezi as a platform that extends beyond a presentation tool:

If one looks past the presentation use case, the combination of the flexibility of a nearly infinite digital canvas and easy-to-use design features makes for a powerful and highly accessible tool for developing thought maps, prototyping designs for digital interfaces and physical spaces, creating bespoke visualizations, and as a platform for comparative visual analysis and annotation.

In Tech Comm, have students create their definition/description assignment in Prezi, using it to annotate and analyze visual representations. Likewise in Intermediate Comp, students could also visually represent arguments, creating texts that analyze how people/groups define the terms of an argument.

To see great examples of how Prezi might be used, go to: Hacking Prezi as a Platform for Visual Composition and Design Experimentation – ProfHacker – The Chronicle of Higher Education.